Recent Trends in Physique and Motor Ability of Preschool Children-Trends After 2000 in Japan
American Journal of Sports Science
Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2020, Pages: 33-38
Received: May 14, 2020; Accepted: Jun. 1, 2020; Published: Jun. 17, 2020
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Authors
Kohsuke Kasuya kohsuke28kasuya@gmail.com, Graduate School of Business Administration and Computer Science, Aichi Institute of Technology, Toyota, Aichi, Japan
Katsunori Fujii, Graduate School of Business Administration and Computer Science, Aichi Institute of Technology, Toyota, Aichi, Japan
Nozomi Tanaka, Sports and Health Science, Tokai Gakuen University, Miyoshi, Aichi, Japan
Toshiro Sakai, Life and Health Science, Chubu University, Kasugai, Aichi, Japan
Yuki Takeyama, Graduate School of Business Administration and Computer Science, Aichi Institute of Technology, Toyota, Aichi, Japan
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Abstract
The purpose of this study was to clarify the trends since 2000 in body shape, physical strength, and motor ability in early childhood in Japan. The study subjects were kindergarten and nursery school girls (age 3–5 years old) in Aichi Prefecture, Japan. Physique (height and weight), quantitative motor ability (20 m dash, standing long jump, tennis ball throw, side step, one-leg hop, hanging from a horizontal bar, and general motor ability (jump over and under) were compared in the 1999 and 2009 school years. The results revealed that, compared with ten years earlier, height was approximately 0.9 cm shorter in 4-year-old girls and weight was approximately 0.3 kg lighter in 3- and 4-year-old girls in 2009. In physical strength and motor ability, the time for jump over and under was shorter in 3-year-olds, the number of times a rope was jumped was higher and the time hanging from a horizontal bar was longer, and the time for jump over and under was shorter in 4-year-olds. In 5-year-olds, only an increase in the number of times a rope was jumped increased. The tennis ball throw and side steps were not significantly different from 10 years earlier in any of the ages. Physique, physical strength, and motor ability improved with growth, but compared with 10 years earlier many of the items were found to decrease or remain the same in all ages.
Keywords
Preschool Girls, Physique, Physical Strength, Annual Comparison
To cite this article
Kohsuke Kasuya kohsuke28kasuya@gmail.com, Katsunori Fujii, Nozomi Tanaka, Toshiro Sakai, Yuki Takeyama, Recent Trends in Physique and Motor Ability of Preschool Children-Trends After 2000 in Japan, American Journal of Sports Science. Vol. 8, No. 2, 2020, pp. 33-38. doi: 10.11648/j.ajss.20200802.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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